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                    Posts with keyword: google


                    Suggesting Changes to Google Places

                    This post explains how to update the categorization of a business in Google Places.
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                    Eric Schmidt's Commerce Fantasy

                    Eric Schmidt's vision of ecommerce in the future lines right up with the anonymous ecommerce application that I wrote last month.
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                    Google Plus: On Trust, Reputation, Pseudonyms, and Value

                    Google made an architectural decision to require real names, rather than pseudonyms, on Google Plus. The result is a platform that encourages better reciprocal acts and thus creates more value, for users as well as Google, than one based on pseudonyms.
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                    Getting Good Descriptions When Sharing on Google Plus

                    Google Plus gets it's description from the meta item named description. Mine was set to a static string describing the blog, not the content of the entry. I've fixed it. Here's how I did it.
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                    Google Plus Comment Filter

                    One of the things I dislike about the G+ streams is the way comments are handled. For most people it's OK, but for folks like +Robert Scoble and +Jesse Stay who have tons of followers, they're comments come in fast and furious making it tough to even scroll past their posts to see what's below. I'm used to having things my way, so I wrote a Kynetx app that hides the comments. In their place it puts a link with the number of recent comments. Clicking on the link shows the comments. The link is a toggle, so clicking
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                    Saying Goodbye to ExpertsExchange! Creating a Personal Block List with Kynetx

                    Yesterday Google announced a Chrome extension that allows you to create a personal block list of Web site URLs. The idea is to reduce spam in search results by letting users block sites from their personal search results. The extension also sends this information to Google so that they can crowdsource their search spam efforts. But what if you want to do this Firefox or Internet Explorer? Or on Yahoo! or Bing? Kynetx to the rescue! When we saw the Google extension we thought "great idea" but we can do better with KRL. KRL is a language that lets
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                    Voting at API Hack Day: A Kynetx App

                    Sam Curren and Brad Hitze were at API Hack Day yesterday. In a fit of meta hacking, Sam created a voting app that was, at the same time, an app competing in the hackathon and the app recording the votes for who won. The API Hack Day results we computed and communicated in real time using a twitter account from votes made via phone or SMS. Sam's app combined Twilio, Twitter, and a Google spreadsheet. Sam reports that a few people gamed it by provisioning and then dropping telephone numbers, but that's OK. It was still fun. Next time
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                    Google, China, and Trust

                    Yesterday Google redirected google.cn to Google's Hong Kong site after a many month-long war of words between Google and the Chinese government. Google accused the Chinese government of industrial espionage and has been chaffing under the Chinese government's requirement for censorship. There's a lot of commentary about Google destroying their chances to compete in the world's fastest growing economy, but I want to focus on something else. Google was caught between what it thought was the right thing and it's desire--some would say need--to do business in China. Google chose the right thing. One of the
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                    It's My Browser and I'll Auto-Click if I Want To!

                    A month ago, I posted a piece claiming my right to a purpose-centric web. In it, I stated: I claim the right to mash-up, remix, annotate, augment, and otherwise modify Web content for my purposes in my browser using any tool I choose and I extend to everyone else that same privilege. Not surprisingly, the EFF agrees with me. Not on this exact issue, but in the spirit of the user having the right to control the experience on their own machine. They say: Free file hosting provider MediaFire seems to think that, when you follow
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                    The Futility of Positively Identifying Commenters

                    Image by El Tipo Gráfico via Flickr A recent NY Times article discusses the Chinese order for Web sites to register and post comments using their true identities. Of course, in a totalitarian regime (are we calling China that these days?) identity is a tool that the state uses to control dissent and it's clear that's what's behind this. This article caught my attention because of the attention that SideWiki has been getting this week. John Gillmore said "The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it." SideWiki is an example of how what China's attempting is ultimately
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                    Claiming My Right to a Purpose-Centric Web: SideWiki

                    Image via CrunchBase Yesterday Google released a small project called SideWiki. SideWiki, enabled by the Google Toolbar, allows people to write commentary about Web pages and see the comments that other have left. The service is opt-in: people can install the toolbar or not and even when it's there, turn SideWiki off if they don't want to see it. But it's not opt-in for a site--you can comment on any page without the permission of the owner. The reaction has been interesting. I've seen tweets from people about how they thought it was wrong for people to be able
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                    What Would Google Do: The Slideshow

                    Here's a slideshow that does a nice job of summarizing Jeff Jarvis' book What Would Google Do? The book is worth reading, but this presentation hits the high points.
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                    Sam Rides 1000: Kynetx and Google Docs

                    Sam Curren, who works at Kynetx set a goal to ride his bike 1000 miles this summer. And because he's a geek, he instrumented the whole effort so that we could all follow his efforts. The way he created a dashboard of sorts for his riding using a combination of Google Docs and a Kynetx App. Sam's first task was data collection. He uses a Android-powered G1 for his phone. He installed the My Tracks application to record the data for his ride and then uploaded the data to Google Spreadsheets. Creating his "dashboard" involved using Yahoo!
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                    Good Succeeds by Creating Useful Products

                    An old friend from Excite@Home, Jeff Huber was quoted in the NY Times on Google's product marketing strategy and the issue of data privacy: "We do have a philosophy that our products should speak for themselves. We tend not to make a lot of noise," said Jeff Huber, senior vice president for engineering at Google. As always with Google, the price point is appealing: zero, if you don't count the amount of personal data that I am trading for all that utility. With Google, it is always simple, and any engineer will tell you that simple
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                    After the Death of Advertising, Shopper and Merchants Can Start Talking

                    Dave Winer Dave Winer wrote yesterday about the death of online advertising. He says: I've been saying it for as long as people have been building businesses on advertising on the web, it's not a longterm thing. Now we're at the end of the road. Assuming the economy comes back from the recession-depression thing that it's in now, when it does, we will have completely moved on from advertising. The web will still be used for commercial purposes, people will still buy things from Amazon and Amazon-like sites, but they will find information for products as they do now,
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                    Why Does Google Think I am in Spain?

                    For the last few days whenever I and others at the office do a Google search, we get redirected to google.es. I noticed today that I'm seeing Google Ad Sense ads in Spanish as well. I don't think it's something on my configuration, machine, or profile because it only happens at the office and happens to others as well. The office IP is 74.81.253.227 which Maxmind thinks is in Utah (because it is). But assuming that Google is making the decision based on GeoIP, they clearly don't. Does anyone know whether Google is indeed making these decisions based on
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                    Mossberg on the G1 Phone

                    Walt Mossberg, the technology reviewer for the Wall Street Journal has a review of the G1, sometimes known as the gPhone. The G1 is Google's competitor to the iPhone. He says: I have been testing the G1 extensively, in multiple cities and in multiple scenarios. In general, I like it and consider it a worthy competitor to the iPhone. Both devices run on fast 3G phone networks and include Wi-Fi. Both have smart-touch interfaces and robust Web browsers. Both have the ability to easily download third-party apps, or programs. But the two devices have different strengths and weaknesses, and
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                    Velocity 08: Storage at Scale

                    Google's reliability strategy is to buy cheap hardware with no reliability features and create reliable clusters from them because no problem Google wants to solve fits on a single machine anyway. The Google File System (GFS) is a cluster file system with a familiar interface, but not POSIX compliant. Bigtable is a distributed database system. This has a custom interface, not SQL. There are 100's of instances of each of these cells scaling in to 1000's of servers and petabytes of data. in the GFS, a master manages metadata. Data is broken into chunks (64Mb) and multiple copies (typically
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                    Google App Engine at the CTO Breakfast

                    Not Getting Things Done(click to enlarge) There was a pretty big crowd at this morning's CTO Breakfast. Sam Curran had spent some time building an application on Google App Engine, so we had him demo his app and show us the code. Overall, Google Apps looks like a very nice piece of infrastructure for building Web applications. The database integration with Big Table and Google's authentication platform add some good tools for quickly building applications. We got into a pretty large discussion of the pros and cons of Google Apps, Amazon Web services, dedicated hosting, and so on. None
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                    Google Apps for the iPhone: Much Improved

                    Apple iPhone(click to enlarge) Since yesterday's announcement that Google had released an iPhone-ready look and feel for it's Google Apps, I've been playing with GMail and Google Reader quite a bit on the iPhone. This is a much improved experience. I'm impressed. The apps are responsive and function well on the reduced real estate of the iPhone screen. Because GMail pre-loads recent messages, clicking on a message to read it brings it up nearly instantaneously. The address fields also auto-complete. I could see myself using GMail on the iPhone instead of the built in Mail application and getting along
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                    Google's Hardware Initiatives

                    Here's a couple of very interesting articles about Google's home grown 10Gb Ethernet switches and how it builds it's own servers.
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                    Google Chart API

                    Google has released a chart API that returns PNG files from an HTTP GET. The following types of charts are available: Line chart Bar chart Pie chart Venn diagram Scatter plot The chart to the right was created using this URL: http://chart.apis.google.com/chart? cht=p3& chd=s:Uf9a& chs=200x100& chl=A|B|C|D Adding charts to Web sites just got a lot easier.
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                    Google Web Toolkit

                    I just posted my interview with Bruce Johnson on the Google Web Toolkit. This was a fun interview and I learned a lot. GWT allows you to write AJAX applications in Java that then gets compiled to Javascript.
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                    Google Goes Fishing

                    Jeff Barr has a humorous look at the approach junior Google recruiters are using on him. As Scoble said: Anyone who does an hour's worth of research with a search engine, like, say, Google's, knows that Jeff is worth hiring and isn't worth treating with a bit of the usual filtering bulls##t. Either hire him, or leave him alone. I also wouldn't let newbie recruiters even get close to anyone who has a blog --- I'd make sure that bloggers get handled by a real pro, not the amateur hour kind of hiring folks that are pitching Jeff currently.
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                    Bikely: Bike Routes on Google Maps

                    I found a cool little application that uses Google maps for bike routes called Bikely. Here's a route near my house that goes around Utah Lake.
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                    New York to Paris, Google Style

                    Google can give you directions to help you get from new York to Paris. On second thought, maybe there not as much help as I originally thought. Check out line 23.
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                    Google's Solar Power Installation

                    Anthony Ravitz is talking about how Google installed 1.6MW of solar panels at their headquarters. He starts by talking about all of Google's green initiatives. The solar project, with financial incentives from PG&E, has a payback of 7.5 years. Solar works best at the same times that peak power is needed. Google's is the largest commercial installation of solar in the US. It uses 9212 Sharp 208 photovoltaic modules. The modules we put on standing metal seam roofs. On sloped roofs, they're mounted flat on the southface, but on the north face, they're kicked up. On flat roofs, they're
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                    Viacom, Joost, and YouTube

                    Today, Viacom stuck it to YouTube and Google by cutting a deal with Joost to host Viacom videos. So far no Comedy Central. Here's the question that this raises: what happens to cable companies when content owners like Viacom are making deals with Internet companies for distribution? Now would be a great time to short cable stocks.
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                    1337 on Google

                    I just found Google's Leet search engine. H4x0r can now 534rc# in 1337. Update: You can also get the Google Toolbar in 1337.
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                    CTO Breakfast Report for October

                    I posted a piece on why mobile data centers matter at Between the Lines. My thoughts were in response to the most recent Gillmor Gang where Sun's new mobile data centers were discussed. Another interesting tidbit from that show was a discussion of Google Office. The consensus of the gang was that Google Office was a winner because of its collaboration features. Calacanis mentioned that he likes to have group editing sessions with people with everyone on a phone conference, getting a document ready. I asked the group at my CTO Breakfast about Google Office this morning. Several had
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                    Google's Serendipitous Uses

                    Derrick Story has a nifty tip for using GMail to convert Word docs to HTML. Just send it as an attachment to your GMail account and then select "View as HTML" next to the attachment. I just tried it with this Word doc and got this HTML document. Very nice. Now, if someone would just get around to building a tool that you drag a Word doc onto and it uses GMail to convert it to HTML and deposit the result in the same directory, that would be awesome.
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                    Mashups, Web Data, and APIs

                    Frank Mantek, Jeff Barr, Dan Theurer, and Kevin Lawver(click to enlarge) I decided to take in Rohit Khare's panel on Next Wave (Business) this morning. This was part of the developer track that has normally been Rohit was kind enough to invite me to the panel dinner last night. It was fun and I Dan Theurer from Yahoo! was first up and used the theme "What Powers Web 2.0 Mashups?" Dan introduced the Yahoo! Developer Network. The first APIs that Yahoo! launched were the search APIs a little over a year ago. He showed a long list of APIs that
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                    Trusting Google Authentication

                    In an earlier entry, I said With no fanfare at all, Google has created a universal login for anyone who wants to use it. From Phil Windley's Technometria | Using Google's Universal Authentication EngineReferenced Tue Mar 21 2006 08:22:50 GMT-0700 (MST) Well, not quite. I had a couple of my students, Devlin Daley and Harsh Nagaonkar spend a little time playing with it. As presently constituted, the token you get back is long lived and replayable. It's better than giving a third party site your password, but not much. Anyone with your token can use it to log in
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                    Peter Norvig at BYU

                    With the reams of stuff I spewing out at ETech, there's a real danger this will get lost in the middle, but I persist. Peter Novig, Director of Search Quality at Google will be speaking at this week's CS Dept. Colloquium. If you're in the area and interested, you ought to try to go. I think it will be very good. I'm genuinely sorry I'm going to be in CA and miss it. Here's Peter's abstract: The system of publishing the written word has made more knowledge available to more people than any other technology. No other system comes
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                    Using Google's Universal Authentication Engine

                    Google's Chat service, GTalk, is based on XMPP, the protocol behind Jabber. That's why you can use any Jabber client with GTalk. This has other implications beyond chat clients, however. XMPP has a very capable authentication mechanism built-in to service distributed chat servers, but you can use XMPP authentication for anything. Google has conviniently tied this authentication service to your Google account. That means that you could build an application that let's people log in using their Google account name (what I call GIDs) and password without any prior arrangement with Google. With no fanfare at all, Google has
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                    Google and Taguchi

                    Jeff Huber, an old friend from Excite@Home days, landed in this Cringely column on whether or not Google is using Taguchi to optimize return on AdSense. Jeff, who heads engineering for AdSense, says "In short, no."
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                    Google Base Portends a Structured Web

                    I wrote a piece at Between the Lines today about the newly launched Google Base. Google Base has been described variously as an online database, competition for CraigsList, or Google's first crack at eBay. And of course, Base is being judged in that light: Google Base can be used to store information of any sort--the company seems to like using recipes as an example. Already, there's commercial stuff like classified ads and job listings in there; the service has been described as an eBay killer or a Craigslist killer. At the moment, it's clearly very far from being either.
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                    Google News Reader

                    Yesterday Google announced their news reader. I played with it a little and wrote a review over at Between the Lines. My bottom line: I like it and I'm going to keep using it.
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